Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Katie Books by James Mayhew

Katie is a little girl who has grand adventures in art museums. When children read these stories they learned about famous works of art in an engaging way.



In Katie and the Bathers Katie climbs into a painting, ends up flooding the museum and finds a painting of a magician to help get the museum back in order before the guard comes through. Kids love these books and request them over and over.





This post is linked to:
Tuesday Tots
Capri +3
Reading Confetti 
Hearts for Home 
Read, Explore, Learn
123 Homeschol 4 Me
Sun Scholars




* I did not receive any compensation for this recommendation. I'm just a homeschooling mom who has found many products that I like. If you're interested in the products I recommend on this blog I want to make it easy for you to find them. 
** I am an Amazon associate and receive a small portion of the sales on orders made after clicking in from this site, which I promptly spend on homeschooling books and supplies for my children.

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Metal Detecting - Bullets

Metal detecting is an interesting hobby, because it can lead in so many directions. Learning about science and history while improving research skills are all covered.


The photo above shows four coins (middle row and bottom center and right), a bottle cap (bottom left), a button of some sort (top left) and several pieces of ammunition. The musket ball (upper right) is made of lead. Musket balls were used for hunting and war, but haven't been commonly used since the 1800's. While metal detecting, my son has now found three. To clean them he lets them sit in a bowl of vinegar. They are heavy and by holding them he learned a bit more about science and materials.

There are many educational benefits in encouraging kids in there interests. Passion often motivates children and adults to read, research and experiment.


This post is linked to:
Real Family Fun
Kid Co-op


Monday, July 29, 2013

July Fun and Speed! Giveaway

We haven't been to the hospital since last Monday, so we have been able to focus on the more normal aspects of our life. This week we are still concentrating on summer: swimming, biking and free time. For me free time means exercising, playing with kids, preparing for school to start, blogging and Speed!


This week Traci at The Bender Bunch is hosting a giveaway for my skip-counting card game Speed! Stop by her blog for a chance to win. While you're there be sure to browse her blog. She is a teacher full of ideas. She just created reading benches from milk crates and last month she painted a teacher chair in fantastic bright colors.

The neighborhood dads got together Saturday to install new equipment at the playground.

The grape vines are out of control. We plan to eat grapes all through the month of September.

My son and his friend got caught in a rain shower during a walk. Luckily the air was warm, so they didn't mind.

The fashionable hedgehogs continue to dress up often, play games and occasionally get lost. Vanilla hid behind some toys and was missing for two days. We are all happy to have her back.

This post is linked to:
Giveaway Day
Homegrown Learners

Sunday, July 28, 2013

Density of Liquids

Density is a measurement of how tightly molecules are packed together. Calculating density is easy and makes a fun hands on math and science project. A while back we measured the density of a few solid materials. This time we found the density of liquids.

To calculate density first measure the quantity of a liquid (ml).


Next weight the liquid (grams).

Then divide to get grams/ml.

Water, dish soap and corn syrup are good liquids to try.


Saturday, July 27, 2013

Viking Unit Study - Games

Week 4: We played a game the Vikings used to play.


Nine Men Morris or Muhle is a strategy game played today. It was also played by the Vikings and other ancient peoples. During our Viking History Co-op we missed the week Viking games were studied, but after doing a little investigation, it turned out we actually owned the game. It was on the back of our backgammon board. Since we had a great time playing the Ancient Roman Game Tabula and Royal Game of Ur which dates to Mesopotamia, we knew we had to give Muhle a try.

Two players try to get three of their pieces in a row to create a Muhle. When a player successfully gets three pieces in a row he/she may remove one of the opponents pieces. When a player has only two pieces or cannot move the game is over and the other player has won. Here are the rules.


To see our other Viking Unit Study activities please visit our History Page.




This post is linked to:
True Aim Education

* I did not receive any compensation for this recommendation. I'm just a homeschooling mom who has found many products that I like. If you're interested in the products I recommend on this blog I want to make it easy for you to find them. 
 ** I am an Amazon associate and receive a small portion of the sales on orders made after clicking in from this site, which I promptly spend on homeschooling books and supplies for my children.

Friday, July 26, 2013

Hobbies and Handicrafts - July 26

Life with Moore Babies shared a post about kids making trail mix. A few weeks ago Look What Mom Found shared a similar post. Teaching kids to prepare simple foods results in a huge intrinsic reward when they see others enjoying their hard work. In addition, preparing trail mix involves measuring (math skills), pouring, mixing and scooping which all improve coordination. This is an idea worth duplicating!


Please grab a button and share what has been keeping your kids busy during these hot summer days.




Thursday, July 25, 2013

Lesson Planning - Science Curriculum

Last year for science we did an extensive cell and the human body study. In fact, I still have human body posts that will last until January. In the mean time I've been planning for this year's science study. Earth Science!

I'm so excited for this topic. All summer I have been gathering resources and putting together an outline of topics. Between rocks and minerals, earth layers, erosion, climates, magnetic field, volcanoes and tectonic plates there is so much to cover. I have tons of videos bookmarked and have been browsing library books. Here's a small preview of some of the activities I plan to do.



Last week bloggers shared their plans for math and the week before it was writing. There are many more subjects coming up and I'd love to see how you teach them. Here's the Schedule.

What are your plans for science?


Link-Up Rules
  • Link-up to your post URL
  • Include a link back to this page in your post – You can grab the button below
  • Check out what other educators have planned for science and come back next week to link-up your history posts

Speed!


Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Game of Life - Math

We played The Game of Life for math.

There's nothing new about The Game of Life. It's was created in 1860 and has been sold publicly since the 1960's. I liked it as a kid and my kids like it now.

I am a huge fan of playing games to learn and practice math skills. What I like about The Game of Life is that the lowest denomination of money is $5,000. When the kids play they are constantly practicing adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing in the thousands which helps them to understand place value.

Now that summer is here we are on a school break we actually aren't doing any school. We're just playing games and following our interests which can be just as educational.

To see other math games and activities please visit our Math Page.







* I did not receive any compensation for this recommendation. I'm just a homeschooling mom who has found many products that I like. If you're interested in the products I recommend on this blog I want to make it easy for you to find them. 
** I am an Amazon associate and receive a small portion of the sales on orders made after clicking in from this site, which I promptly spend on homeschooling books and supplies for my children.

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Doll Clothes - How it's Made

"My hedgehog need a new dress." That's a frequently heard sentiment in this house.

Creating doll clothes is a wonderful first sewing project for little ones. It's wonderful because they learn a lot about sewing, how clothes are put together and the hard work that goes along with the process. What's more, when they are finished with the first project they are ready to begin more challenging doll clothes.

My five year old constantly watches her eleven year old sister sew clothes for her polar bear and now has advanced another step in her own sewing. She wanted a much more complicated dress for Hedgie and was willing to do all the sewing herself. I helped her cut out the pieces and pin them together, but she did the rest.
For this project she had to put in a lining, sew the shoulder seams, side seams, gather and hem the ruffle. It took several weeks and I'm amazed she stuck with it.


When she finished the dress she created this white fleece dress on her own. She cut two matching pieces and sewed shoulder and side seams. Since she used fleece there was no need for hemming. She did sew on sequence and used glitter glue to line the waist and arms.

For more ideas for a budding seamstress check out my craft page and my older daughter's blog. She writes all about the clothes she has created for her polar bear. There are tons of good ideas.

This post is linked to:
Funky Polkadot Giraffe

Monday, July 22, 2013

Full Swing Summer Mode

We are in full swing summer mode. Since we pretty much missed summer last year we are trying to make up for it this year and the weather is co-operating. It has been sunny for three straight weeks and there's more sun in the forecast.

All the kids played in the sprinkler at the weekly tennis lesson.
Somebody messed up the colors on daddy's iPad. Push the home button three times fast on your iPad and see what happens.

The corn is growing.

.... and so are the beans.

We sold 25 boxes of Speed! to the twenty moms at the Classical Conversations homeschool group meeting.



Several hedgehogs received their very own thrones.

Jemma had a scowl on her face the entire time we were at the hospital this morning. Aside from the attitude, she is doing well. Her blood is stable enough that we don't have to visit the hospital for two weeks. Since June 2012, we have been there at least once per week, so this is a huge increase.

This post is linked to:
Eco Kids
Tuesday Tots
A Mama's Story
The Chicken Chick
Lowercase Letters
Sew Can Do
Keeping it Simple
Montessori Monday
Monday Kid Corner

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Density of Solids

After reading the book Archimedes Takes a Bath, by Joan Lexau we decided to do some density experiments. In the book Archimedes is challenged to determine whether or not the kings goldsmith stole some of the gold he was given to make a new crown. Throughout the story Archimedes is often so focused on his work he forgets to do normal things like eat and bathe. A young boy even has the job of ensuring Archimedes takes care of himself. During the course of the entertaining story he eventually discovers the key to determining if the gold was stolen. - Density.
Density is mass divided by volume - d=m/V - It's simple to measure and calculate. We determined the density of pennies, dry beans, glass and an orange.

First the objects were weighed to determine their mass in grams. Then they were submerged in water to determine their volume in milliliters (ml). The volume of liquid was measured alone, and then with the solid. The two numbers were subtracted to determine the volume of the solid alone. One milliliter is equal to one cubic centimeter. The density of water is one g/cm^3.

Next the mass was divided by volume. We found that pennies were the most dense object we measured. Doing this hands-on experiment was simple, fun, and effective. Now the age old question of "What weighs more a pound of cotton or a pound of bricks?" has a little more meaning.




This post is linked to:
Love2learn
Manic Monday
Montessori Monday
Monday Kid Corner
Relentlessly Fun
Adventures in Mommydom
Hip Homeschool Hop

Saturday, July 20, 2013

Reed Pipes - Pythagoras

We read Pythagoras and the Ratios: A Math Adventure and then made our own reed pipes.

While working more hands-on math activities into the curriculum, Lucinda at Navigating by Joy recommended the book What's Your Angle Pythagoras. Our library didn't have the book, but it did have Pythagoras and the Ratios by the same author so we requested it.

Although intended as a math adventure, the book could be used for activities relating to Ancient Greece. From making togas, to clay pots, maps of Greece, and types of columns...... We did a Greek Unit Study, so there are tons of activity ideas on my History Page.

Materials required for Reed Pipes:
Drinking Straws
Ruler
Scissors
Tape

In the story, Pythagoras fixes his friend's reed pipes by modifying the lengths to specific rations. After the modifications are complete, they sound much better and the two boys are able to play music together.

The book explained the ratios between the length and diameter and each pipe.

My six year old was not big enough to do the math work, but she was able to measure the straws to the proper lengths.

Next they were taped together.......

..... and tested. At first she was disappointed, because they didn't make much sound. She quickly learned a better blowing technique and then found dad to show off.








This post is linked to:
Teaching Blog Addict
We Made That
Made-It Monday
Monday Kid Corner
Montessori Monday
Relentlessly Fun
Hip Homeschool Hop
Manic Monday
No Time for Flash Cards

* I did not receive any compensation for this recommendation. I'm just a homeschooling mom who has found many products that I like. If you're interested in the products I recommend on this blog I want to make it easy for you to find them. 
** I am an Amazon associate and receive a small portion of the sales on orders made after clicking in from this site, which I promptly spend on homeschooling books and supplies for my children.
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